Mongofiles Review

Emailing large files can be a problem in many cases because majority of email providers place a limit of 25MB. Even if your files don’t exceed that limit, it can take a lot of time for it to upload. Fortunately, there are services that offer quick and hassle-free help. One of the most notable sites today is Mongofiles. Basically, users simply need to visit the provider’s site, select the file to be sent, and write the email address of the recipient.

Mongofiles uploads the file you choose into their server and then gives you a private link. Whoever receives this link can download the file immediately, safely, and quickly. The service is definitely a great solution for those who need to handle large files. Mongofiles allows you to send up to 2GB of files which is more than enough in 99% of cases.

It’s easy to see why the service offered by Mongofiles could be so attractive but there are similar websites out there. So how is it different? One thing that differentiates it is that the provider takes your security seriously. Here are other aspects you should consider:

• Private Link – other providers may offer the same file uploading service but a key selling point for Mongofiles is that they keep your files private. Only people you share the link to would be able to access the files. On the other hand, other providers make your files searchable for other users. There is no encryption or security features offered because they make money from people visiting their website to view potentially useful information.

• No Advertisement – many file uploading and sharing sites make their money from advertisement. That’s why if you register on these websites, expect your emails to be “sold”. Even if it isn’t sold to third-parties, you will still receive advertisements and offers from the company on your inbox.

• 30-Day Active Link – the closest thing to Mongofiles is probably YouSendIt. However, the latter only keeps your sharing link active for 7 days while Mongofiles links are valid for 30 days for the free service. Links on the premium service don’t expire. In many cases, this has proven to be useful because no one wants to keep uploading the files if the recipient lost it or if you need to keep track of files.

• Free Up to 100MB - if you like what you’ve read about Mongofiles so far, then go ahead and try it for yourself; it’s free. But keep in mind that the free service is limited to 100MB of files only. The company has a no-spam policy so you need not worry about your privacy. For those who need to send large amounts of files, 10GB of space is offered at $5 a month. Business users can take advantage of the 100GB of storage with 128-bit encryption. It is available for $50 a month.

Whether you are a personal user or a business user, Mongofiles offers something for everyone. When you compare their prices with online backup providers today, it also becomes clear that you can store so much more with this provider. Read Mongfiles reviews.

Oil Spill Recovery Vessels Helping to Save our Environment

Oil spills can cause big problems for our ecosystem. We all remember in 1989 the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William sound, Alaska. It took over a decade for the wildlife to rebound and two decades before things turned back to normal.

In New Jersey is a company called Marine Spill Response Corp., which has a fleet of 15 vessels to clean up oil spills on any of the East Coast ports or inlets. These ships have skimmer take hoses and reels to pick up the oil that floats on top of the water from the spill. They can respond to large or small oil spills with their fleet and even their smaller vessels have four 1000-gallon storage tanks for the recovered oil.

Each unit has oil water separators and oil heaters to help treat the recovered oil. When one of these ships arrives on the scene it lowers out a giant boom and begins to pump the oil through the boom. If you'll recall there was a huge oil spill in Philadelphia on the water in 2004 and there have been several other smaller spills, both from ships and leaky tanks due to inclement weather and man-made mistakes that the Marine Spill Response Corp. has cleaned up.

This is just one way that entrepreneurs and industry are teaming up to help mitigate potential ecosystem disasters in our environment. By preventing such oil spills from polluting the local water, we can save local wildlife from destruction. Please consider all this in 2006.

Australian Outback Vacations In Nullarbor

If you want to experience the ultimate in road trips, look no further than the Nullarbor Plain. Nullarbor is derived from two Latin words meaning "no trees" and this is a very accurate description of the area. Although arid and barren, there is not only incredible beauty in this land, but also lots to see. Covering 77,000 square miles, Nullabor is one of the largest semi arid Karst deserts in the world. The gateway to the desert is the Nullarbor Roadhouse, a motel and service station located next to the historic Nullarbor Homestead. North of here are the Murrawijinie Caves which can be toured with National Parks officers. The desert is home to a large network of caves which are dramatically cut into the rocks, and are often multiple kilometers wide.

East of the roadhouse is the Head of Bight, a popular whale watching spot. Here southern right whales can be viewed from May to the end of October as they congregate in groups of up to one hundred individuals. Boardwalks take visitors to lookouts where they can see the whales and also enjoy the breathtaking view of the cliffs that drop from the Nullabor Plain into the ocean below. Another area that should be a stop on all itineraries is the Nullarbor Bunda Cliffs, a series of lookouts that stretch for over two hundred kilometers.

Along the way, try a stop in Iron Knob, and trace the town's importance in the steel industry at the Mining Museum. More than just a place to stop for services, Nundroo offers excellent fishing, surfing, and local history. If you are interested in Aboriginal culture, stop at the Ceduna Aboriginal Arts and Culture Center, where you'll find authentic art and gifts, and the Language Center that is working to preserve the many varied Aboriginal languages.

Learning To Speak Mandarin – The Road Ahead

When we talk about studying Chinese what we mean by that, in 2010, is really studying Mandarin, also known as standard Mandarin. Compared to Cantonese, which is the second most spoken out of around 50 languages ​​in contemporary China, Mandarin is far larger. Cantonese is pretty much confined to Taiwan and Hong Kong. Mandarin on the other hand is also spoken in both these areas, and the entirety of the rest of the country. This did not come about as an accident. 100 years ago there were more languages ​​and Standard Mandarin was not known as standard. The Mandarin of today is an amalgamation of different dialects but is mostly made up of the old Beijing one. The reason that it is so common today is that it has been artificially promoted by the central government for obvious reasons: one modern nation needs one common mode of communication.

When we talk about Mandarin language studies people often say that they are rather tricky. They are not a walk in the park, but it is my sincere belief that people make it out to be a much more difficult task than it is in reality. The thing we need to remember is that Mandarin is very different from languages ​​that have been derived from Latin or the Germanic branch of European languages. But once those differences have been deal with, learning the rest of the language is much less tricky than it would seem when you are just setting out on that particular journey. These initial bumps in the road can be categorized into two distinct groups; the difficulties of writing Chinese Mandarin and the difficulties of speaking Chinese Mandarin. I write difficulties but in reality it is less about difficulty and more about differences.

The first of these two categories, written Chinese, is mostly hard because there is no alphabet. Instead you need to memorize a great deal of pictures, aka characters. The key to success in this matter lies in not thinking of them as pictures when you try to commit them to memory but rather thinking of them in terms of their underlying structure. The two golden nuggets of information that you need to become familiar with is the building blocks that make up the vast majority of characters, called radical, and the way that these radicals are written, the stroke order. Once you have these two concepts firmly logged in your head you will begin to see the characters as a process of writing and not as a finished product. The picture is complicated but the way that it is formed is as easy as pie. It is a bit like riding a bike really – once you get up and going you will cover a lot of ground very quickly and you will never loose that initial effort you put in while learning the first couple of hundred or so the right way.

The second of the categories, spoken Chinese Mandarin, is mostly different in terms of pronunciation. The grammar really is not that hard. Chinese Mandarin pronunciation, however, is. It is hard because as we know Mandarin lacks an alphabet. Instead of being made up of letters that make a sound when put together we have pictures which give little or no indication regarding how the words sound when spoken. To muddle things up even more the Mandarin language is not only dependent on syllables, it also involves modulation of the pitch. This is what is more commonly known as tones, and it makes Mandarin a tonal language.

However, both the difficulties with getting to grips with Characters and their radicals and stroke order, and the trick to wrapping your tongue around tonal modulation while speaking, can easily be dealt with in a small class size. Learning Mandarin without the individual attention of a teacher is very hard, but once you have someone to correct your pronunciation and show you what you are doing wrong when writing, you are on the home stretch, speeding ahead to proficiency in the language that holds the key to the greatest paradigm shift of our century – the rise of China as economic and political super power.